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SASI athletes beat the heat in Kazakhstan

1 September 2015

Last month four SASI track cyclists successfully competed for Australia at the UCI Junior Track World Championships in Astana, Kazakhstan. The Australian team brought a total of 12 medals home to secure second place in the medal rankings. SASI was represented by Rohan Wight, Derek Radzikiewicz, Chloe Moran and Danielle McKinnirey with all athletes contributing to the medal tally.

All of the SASI athletes contributed to Australia's medal tally with Rohan Wight lead the way winning Gold in the Team Pursuit and Madison and claimed Silver in the Omnium. Radzikiewicz won Gold in the Keirin and Silver in the Team Sprint. Female riders, McKinnirey won Gold in the Omnium while both McKinnirey and Moran were part of the Team Pursuit that won Silver.

When the athletes arrived in Astana they were met with a warmer climate which was drastically different to the cold and heavy conditions that they were training in back home. The conditions inside the track were quite hot and dry making the track fast.

SASI Lead Coach, Jason Niblett was the National Assistant coach and sprint coach, felt that these conditions actually favoured the riders and provided them with confidence while competing.

"Because the athletes knew they were going to be able to go quite fast, it put them in a good mindset." He commented.

One of the most pleasing aspects of the event for Niblett was the athletes’ ability to cope and perform on the international stage and deal with the increased pressures that came with it. The crowd presence and the media coverage of the event was something that the riders had not experienced before.

Niblett believes that his athletes proved that they could perform successfully at an international level.

"They (SASI riders) all came home with a medal, they showed that they can handle the pressures of an international championships.

It is important to be able to cope with these pressures, otherwise it limits how far you can go." Niblett said.

The SASI athletes will now take a break after their great efforts in Astana.

Niblett will begin working with the senior teams for the Oceania Championships in October and is hopeful some of his junior champions will be involved.